Knee

Normal Anatomy of the Knee Joint

The knee is made up of four bones. The femur or thighbone is the bone connecting the hip to the knee. The tibia or shinbone connects the knee to the ankle. The patella (kneecap) is the small bone in front of the knee and rides on the knee joint as the knee bends.

How does the Knee joint work?

Find out more in this web based movie.

Meniscal Tears

Meniscal tears are one of the most frequently reported injuries to the knee joint. The meniscus is a C-shaped fibrocartilaginous structure in the knee incompletely covering the surface of the tibia where it articulates with the femur.

For more information about Meniscal Tears, click on below tabs.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Tears

The anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, is one of the major ligaments of the knee that is located in the middle of the knee and runs from the femur (thigh bone) to the tibia (shin bone). It prevents the tibia from sliding out in front of the femur.

For more information about Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Tears, click on below tab.

Posterior Cruciate Ligament Tear

Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), one of four major ligaments of the knee is situated at the back of the knee. It connects the thighbone (femur) to the shinbone (tibia).

For more information about Posterior Cruciate Ligament Tear, click on below tab.

Lateral Meniscal Injury

Menisci are special paired structures situated between the femur or thigh bone and the tibia or shin bone. These are C –shaped structure placed on the top of the tibia, one on either side, or support the femur during the movement of the knee.

For more information about Lateral Meniscal Injury, click on below tab.

Arthroscopy of the Knee Joint

Arthroscopy is a surgical procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into a joint. Arthroscopy is a term that comes from two Greek words, arthro-, meaning joint, and -skopein, meaning to examine.

The benefits of arthroscopy involve smaller incisions, faster healing, a more rapid recovery, and less scarring. Arthroscopic surgical procedures are often performed on an outpatient basis and the patient is able to return home on the same day.

For more information about Arthroscopy of the Knee Joint, click on below tabs.

Total Knee Replacement (TKR)

A total knee replacement (TKR) or total knee arthroplasty is a surgery that resurfaces arthritic knee joint with an artificial metal or plastic replacement parts called the ‘prostheses’.

For more information about Total Knee Replacement (TKR), click on below tabs.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction

The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the major stabilizing ligaments in the knee. It is a strong rope like structure located in the center of the knee running from the femur to the tibia. When this ligament tears unfortunately, it does not heal and often leads to the feeling of instability in the knee.

ACL reconstruction is a commonly performed surgical procedure and with recent advances in arthroscopic surgery can now be performed with minimal incision and low complication rates.

ACL Reconstruction Hamstring Tendon

For more information about Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction, click on below tabs.

ACL Reconstruction Patellar Tendon

For more information about ACL Reconstruction Patellar Tendon, click on below tabs.

Meniscal Repair

Meniscus is the C-shaped two pieces of cartilage located between thighbone and shin bone that act as shock absorbers and cushion the joints. Meniscus distributes the body weight uniformly across the joint and avoids the pressure on any one part of the joint and development of arthritis.

For more information about Meniscal Repair, click on below tab.

LCL Reconstruction

Lateral collateral ligament (LCL) is a thin set of tissues present on the outer side of the knee, connecting the thighbone (femur) to the fibula (side bone of lower leg). It provides stability as well as limits the sidewise rotation of the knee.

For more information about LCL Reconstruction, click on below tab.

Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), one of four major ligaments of the knee is situated at the back of the knee. It connects the thighbone (femur) to the shinbone (tibia). The PCL limits the backward motion of the shinbone.

For more information about Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction, click on below tabs.

Click on the topics below to find out more from the orthopedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons.

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